Climate worry driving ‘cli-fi’ boom

AFP

Imagine a world where storms inundate coastal megacities, entire species become extinct in the blink of an eye, and conflicts are fought over dwindling natural resources.

Perhaps, not so difficult in 2019.

After a year of devastating extreme weather and worldwide unrest over the emergency posed by climate change, topics that used to belong to the science fiction realm are finding their way into mainstream storytelling.

Back in 2004, Roland Emmerich’s disaster flick ‘The Day After Tomorrow’ depicted a global weather catastrophe, with coastal areas devoured by the sea amid general meteorological mayhem.

Just 15 years on, scenes from the movie resemble images taken from real-life weather events.

As climate change makes superstorms, flooding, wildfires and droughts more likely, a new genre is gaining fatalistic fans the world over: ‘Cli-fi’.

“It’s catching on like wildfire,” said US writer and cli-fi aficionado Dan Bloom.

He credited US President Donald Trump, who has said he will withdraw from the Paris climate deal, with helping promote the genre.

“There’s a lot of people who say that climate change is not real,” said Bloom. “These people are making the rest of us very angry and as a result cli-fi is getting more and more power.”

Andrew Milner, a professor of comparative literature at Melbourne’s Monash University, said that cli-fi was yet to break out from sci-fi’s yoke.

“Both its texts and practitioners relate primarily to the science fiction tradition,” he said.

“(But) it is very clear that the sub-genre has grown very rapidly in recent years.”

Global protest movements such as the Youth Strike for Climate and Extinction Rebellion have heightened public awareness of the issue.

For JR Burgmann, co-author of ‘Science Fiction and Climate Change: A Sociological Approach’, cli-fi films and novels are a logical expression of an increasingly knowledgeable and concerned society.

“This rise is a response to real-world concerns,” he said. “And though I would argue that literature has been rather slow to respond to manmade climate change, it certainly appears to be making up for lost time.”

Because climate change is a truly global problem, cli-fi has become a worldwide, multi-lingual phenomenon.

In France, two major television series focussing on dystopian but conceivable futures have received popular and critical acclaim.

‘The Last Wave’ tells the story of 10 surfers who go missing in bad weather. When they return they can’t remember what happened but some have strange new powers.

‘The Collapse’, set in a post-apocalyptic world where fuel is scarce, nuclear sites are threatened and medicines are rationed, debuted this week.

Recent cli-fi works from around the world include ‘Blackout Island’ by Icelandic author Sigridur Hagalin Bjornsdottir, a Canadian adaptation of Jean Hegland’s ‘Into the Forest’ and ‘Water Knife’, by US author Paolo Bacigalupi.

Novels and films about climate change are nothing new, of course. – AFP

Next Post

Respond, not react to tour bus accident

ShareTweetSharePinOn November 8 morning, I read the report “Bus rams several vehicles, killing teenager in Bayan Lepas”. Sadly, a 16-year-old student was killed and several others injured at a traffic light junction in Penang at 6.30pm the day before. The report stated the tour bus went out of control due […]

Follow Us on Facebook