Zharudin Narudin

KUCHING: Parti Islam Se-Malaysia (PAS) Sarawak has urged the government to tighten the guidelines for entertainment centres, hotels and certain premises that serve alcohol in an effort to solve the drink driving problem.

Sarawak PAS Information chief Zharudin Narudin said those premises could conduct breath testing (BT), whether using mobile or technological device, that could screen blood alcohol concentration (BAC) at the premises’ entrance or exit.

“Random BT at main roads by the police is seen as troublesome for the security personnel and involves cost and time,” he said in a statement today.

He said the government should consider revoking the business and operation licences of the premises if the operator failed to adhere to the said guideline or when the drunkard was found guilty of causing injury and death.

He also suggested for the BAC threshold to be reduced from the existing 0.08 per cent. He believed such step would be able to reduce the risk of dangerous driving.

“The government should also make it compulsory to commercialise awareness on the dangers of drunk driving as a condition in issuing licence to premises that serve alcoholic beverages.

“We can also actively commercialise the same sort of ads in conventional media and social media by holding campaigns,” he said.

Zharudin also suggested that the government create an ‘ignition interlock device’, which is a breath analyser for an individual’s vehicle.

“It requires the driver to blow into a mouthpiece on the device before starting or continuing to operate the vehicle.

“If the resultant breath-alcohol concentration analysed result is greater than the programmed BAC, the device prevents the engine from being started,” he explained.

At the same time, Zharudin advised all Sarawakians to not misunderstand the alcohol ban issue.

“Sarawak PAS concurs with national Information chief Kamaruzaman Mohamad in urging the government to immediately solve the drunk driving problems.

“Sarawak PAS respects the rights of non-Muslims in the state who use alcohol for some of the cultural and traditional events.

“However, we have to understand that if the justification of human rights is used so that there is no defense to the victim, especially the family of the deceased, it is also a violation of an individual’s right to seek justice from the law,” he said.

Zharudin hoped all parties could come together to voice out their suggestions in the effort to reduce or stop the issue of drunk driving.